Trump, the superspreader, going to Oklahoma because chaos will re-elect him

There are now 119,000 deaths to date and 2.2 million cases of COVID-19 in the US.

Trump will likely blame the virus superspread event in Tulsa on protesters, as the media frames can be written in the most arcane ways: “they pulled off my mask”, “they coughed on me”, as Trump really would like some protest violence. Removing a curfew encourages unrest and promotes conflict.

The event is more about Trumpian ego, in a state not in electoral play, with an audience he’s willing to sacrifice.

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The highest risk place and event will have no curfew.



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— PoliticalMama (@politicalmablog) June 19, 2020

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— Philip Rucker (@PhilipRucker) June 19, 2020

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— Jeremy Diamond (@JDiamond1) June 19, 2020

Washington (CNN)

Earlier this month, several top Trump campaign advisers gathered for a virtual strategy session to address a political reality they could no longer ignore: The President was in serious trouble.

For weeks, the collective trauma of the coronavirus, the resulting recession and the simmering unrest over racism and police brutality had eroded Trump's approval rating and given his presumptive Democratic opponent Joe Biden a sizeable early lead.
It was clear that a reset was in order.
[…]
The message that emerged from the meeting was simple — Trump needed to get back on the road and show voters the country is ready to reopen. The campaign settled on pushing a clear message of America's comeback and distilled the idea into three words: “Renewing. Restoring. Rebuilding.” That means leaning hard into Trump's economic track record, which polling shows remains his biggest strength among voters. The campaign will also take every opportunity to define Biden as weak, ineffectual and hiding in his basement.
[…]
Rather than force Trump to meet the moment and unite the country, the campaign is looking to target two specific voter groups: die-hard, largely rural supporters who failed to come out in the midterms to vote for Republicans, and white suburban moderates and independents who approve of Trump's handling of the economy but remain unsure about supporting him in November.
It's this second group that his team is hoping will be a receptive audience for a broad, positive message about reopening the country. Republican strategists who spoke to CNN say their research shows voters consistently give Trump his highest marks on the economy. Buoyed soon after by a better-than-expected jobs report for May, the campaign put $10 million behind a new TV ad touting “the great American comeback.” But that's a risky bet for Trump, given that unemployment remains in double digits.
Scott Jennings, the former deputy White House political director under President George W. Bush, said Trump can still turn things around — particularly if the economy rebounds before November.

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“…the changing organizational nature and rapid spread of far-right extremism, which is bolstered by conspiracy theories and stressors during an already volatile election year, can make it difficult for police to interdict.”

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— Mr. Stino (@Stinodepino) June 17, 2020

The assessment, dated June 15 and obtained by Politico, reported that “recent events indicate violent adherents of the boogaloo ideology likely reside in the National Capital Region, and others may be willing to travel far distances to incite civil unrest or conduct violence encouraged in online forums associated with the movement.”

[…]

Several boogaloo adherents have been charged in recent weeks for acts ranging from felony murder to terrorism, and police last month seized military-style assault rifles from so-called “boogaloo bois” in Denver.

The DHS note says boogaloo tactics “likely will be repeated in future similar incidents wherein domestic terrorists attempt to shut down or endanger government operations, judging from domestic terrorists’ continued calls for attacks.”

[…]

Brian Levin, executive director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at Cal State San Bernardino, said the center’s research shows there have been 27 homicides connected to far-right extremists in the U.S. since 2019, with none connected to the far-left since at least 2016. White supremacists, he added, continue to pose the “most ascendent and prominent threat,” Levin said.

Other think tanks have compiled similar data. The Center for Strategic and International Studies released a report on Wednesday that found that “right-wing extremists perpetrated two thirds of the attacks and plots in the United States in 2019 and over 90 percent between January 1 and May 8, 2020,” defining such extremists as “white supremacists, anti-government extremists, and incels.”

www.politico.com/…

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— Josh (@jgrclarke) June 18, 2020

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— Charles P. Pierce (@CharlesPPierce) June 19, 2020

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— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) June 19, 2020

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— Hillary Huang (@HHuang_) June 19, 2020

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— Jake Tapper (@jaketapper) June 19, 2020

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— Newsweek (@Newsweek) June 19, 2020

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— David Ingram (@David_Ingram) June 19, 2020

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— Greg Sargent (@ThePlumLineGS) June 19, 2020

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