Trump doesn’t care whether he loses his security deposit. He just wants the chaos of dying meat processors, conspiracy-driven ICU trespassers, and a quarter-million dead Americans from COVID-19. And in foreign policy, Trump’s inviting skunk, gophers, and groundhogs into the crawlspaces before moving out. 

Washington (CNN)

President Donald Trump's order of a further withdrawal of US troops from Afghanistan and Iraq is the latest foreign policy move on a growing list in his final weeks in office that are meant to limit President-elect Joe Biden's options before he takes office in January.

The White House has directed newly installed acting Defense Secretary Christopher Miller to focus his attention in the remaining weeks on cyber and irregular warfare, with a focus on China in particular, an administration official tells CNN. It is contemplating new terrorist designations in Yemen that could complicate efforts to broker peace. And it has rushed through authorization of a massive arms sale that could alter the balance of power in the Middle East.
The Trump team has prepared legally required transition memos describing policy challenges, but there are no discussions about actions they could take or pause. Instead, the White House is barreling ahead. A second official tells CNN their goal is to set so many fires that it will be hard for the Biden administration to put them all out.
It's a strategy that radically breaks with past practice, could raise national security risks and will surely compound challenges for the Biden team — but it could also backfire. Analysts and people close to the Biden transition argue the Trump team may act so aggressively that reversing some of its steps will earn Biden easy goodwill points and negotiating power with adversaries.
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“As of Nov. 13, there have been at least 42,000 reported positive cases tied to meatpacking facilities in at least 470 plants in 40 states, and at least 215 reported worker deaths in at least 51 plants in 27 states.” Playing a game of chicken pork: Tyson plant manager's betting pool wagered on the number of workers getting COVID-19

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A wrongful death lawsuit tied to COVID-19 infections in a Waterloo pork processing plant alleges that during the initial stages the pandemic, Tyson Foods ordered employees to report for work while supervisors privately wagered money on the number of workers who would be sickened by the deadly virus.

Earlier this year, the family of the late Isidro Fernandez sued the meatpacking company, alleging Fernandez was exposed to the coronavirus at the Waterloo plant where he worked. The lawsuit alleges Tyson Foods is guilty of a “willful and wanton disregard for workplace safety.”

Fernandez, who died on April 20, was one of at least five Waterloo plant employees who died of the virus. According to the Black Hawk County Health Department, more than 1,000 workers at the plant — over a third of the facility’s workforce — contracted the virus.

The lawsuit alleges that despite the uncontrolled spread of the virus at the plant, Tyson required its employees to work long hours in cramped conditions without providing the appropriate personal protective equipment and without ensuring workplace-safety measures were followed.

The lawsuit was recently amended and includes a number of new allegations against the company and plant officials. Among them:

  • In mid-April, around the time Black Hawk County Sherriff Tony Thompson visited the plant and reported the working conditions there “shook [him] to the core,” plant manager Tom Hart organized a cash-buy-in, winner-take-all, betting pool for supervisors and managers to wager how many plant employees would test positive for COVID-19.

iowacapitaldispatch.com/…

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Maybe they’re finally doing that Where’s Waldo, Carmen San Diego thing with “Q”.

Utah county anti-maskers tried to break into a hospital ICU wing to prove it wasn’t as full as the media and health department claimed.

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PROVO – Utah Valley Hospital says a handful of conspiracy theorists recently tried to get into their intensive care unit.

Hospital administrator Kyle Hansen told the Provo City Council this week that about five people have attempted to get inside because they question whether the ICU is as full as some say.

A few of them also brought video cameras.

“We have individuals trying to sneak into the hospital to visualize and videotape this themselves,” Hansen said.

So far, it seems no one has been successful getting in.

However, Hansen said what the conspiracy theorists did has forced the hospital to take extra precautions when it comes to visitors and people being admitted.

www.ksl.com/…

One of two QAnon rookie members of Congress:

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