Two op-eds in the New York Times caught my attention this morning. First up is Gail Collins — Trump’s Magic Word — because of what she wrote at the end:

This could be a great protest theme. Fill the street with banners saying, “Mr. President, we’re not really questioning your masculinity.” Very positive message that’ll drive him completely nuts.

I think this is a great idea — but I also want to see the Lincoln Project do something with this as well. LP is the perfect vehicle for going negative on Bunker Baby™.  (I’ve suggested “Bunker Boy” but for this slant, Bunker Baby is better.)

Collins’s column is mostly about how Trump has been using the “dominate” word a lot lately. The governors have to dominate; the military will dominate the “battlespace”; in Minneapolis things were out of control until the National Guard moved and dominated it.

IANAPs (I am not a psychologist), nor is Collins, but her observation about dominance issues is right on target:

Now, some people believe that when men go overboard with weaponry issues it may be linked to insecurity about their sexuality. Certainly isn’t always true, but here you’ve got a guy who talks compulsively both about the Second Amendment and his need to dominate.

Then there’s Nicholas Kristof: Trump Uses the Military to Prove His Manhood:

The impulse to call in the military is perhaps rooted not only in his authoritarian instincts but also in something more personal. Trump seemed mortified at disclosures that when protesters approached the White House on Friday night he was rushed to an underground bunker; on Wednesday, he claimed instead that he went down “more for an inspection.”

Embarrassment at his “inspection” trip seems to have fueled his desire to project toughness by using the United States armed forces as a prop.

and he concludes, as does Gail Collins, that is about Trump’s insecurity about the size of his . . . hands:

When you’ve seen the ugliness of war, you don’t lightly summon tanks, helicopters or heavily armed troops to deal with civil disturbances; that’s a dangerous and damaging tactic of an insecure old man who claimed heel spurs to dodge the Vietnam draft and now needs to prove his own manhood.

(By the way, the photo up there is from a story about the Republican debate on March 3, 2016: Donald Trump defends size of his penis.  The Washington Post seriously looked into the question of Trump’s hands back in the 2016 campaign and concluded that, Yes, Donald Trump’s hands are actually pretty small. The things we subject the American people to these days.)

The Lincoln Project’s latest ad calls Trump a coward, which has to got to hit him in the gut. Their next ad should aim a little lower.