Tucker Carlson just said black people are coming for you (whoever that privileged “You” is)

What a frightened bunch, that Fox News audience, so sensitive to racist dog whistles, because the GOP is apparently blameless for racist policies. More frightening is that “this is a moment of strong cross-racial solidarity,” and the reactionary appeals of “All Lives Matter” or “Blue Lives Matter” have little weight.

But Carlson is trying hard to help Trump keep his base, or at least the suburban swing-state people who have some social contact with that base and who are a bit softer about their support for #BunkerBoy.

Trump has yet to figure out how to counter his ability to screw up his own stunts, much less the stunts contrived by his brain trust of Jarvanka and hope Hicks. 

“This may be a lot of things, this moment we are living through, but it is definitely not about black lives and remember that when they come for you, and at this rate, they will.”

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Tucker Carlson opened his show Monday with a lengthy monologue going off on the Black Lives Matter movement, swiping at Mitt Romney for joining a march, and saying people are trying to shut down any criticism of the protests.

He told viewers that what’s happening across the country “has very little to do with black lives,” saying “if Democratic leaders cared about saving the lives of black people, and they should, they wouldn’t ignore the murder of thousands of young black men in their cities every year. They wouldn’t put abortion clinics in black neighborhoods. They would instead do their very best to improve the public schools and to encourage intact families, which we know beyond a shadow of a doubt is central to the life prospects of children. If they tried to make black neighborhoods as safe as their own neighborhoods.”

www.mediaite.com/…

Q: “The president is not sorry for the way things went?”

Press Sec. Kayleigh McEnany: “No, the president is sorry about the fact that antifa wreaked havoc in our streets.”

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— Chris Hayes (@chrislhayes) June 8, 2020

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Remember that in 2016 we would be at the moment when Trump was getting troubled by Paul Manafort’s running of his campaign.

“He’s Going to Broom Kushner and Parscale”:

In Donald Trump’s West Wing, being a member of the Trump family has historically been the ultimate job security. But that truism is being stress-tested after a run of polls consistently show Trump losing to Joe Biden at this stage of the race—a CNN poll this morning has him down 14 points. According to a source close to the White House, Trump has mulled taking oversight of the campaign away from his son-in-law Jared Kushner. “Trump is malignantly crazy about the bad poll numbers,” a former West Wing official said. “He’s going to broom Kushner and [Brad] Parscale—the numbers are not getting better,” a Republican close to the campaign said.

Long before the reelection campaign went sideways, Trump frequently blew up at Kushner. For instance, former West Wing officials recall how Trump hated when Kushner received too much positive press (In January, Trump was rankled when Kushner’s portrait graced the cover of Time). “Any time Jared is in the papers, Trump complains, ‘We have to get Jared back to New York!’” said a Republican who heard Trump make the comment. In the end, the source cautioned that Trump won’t push Kushner out. “This is typical with him and Jared,” the source said.

[…]

The polling has gotten worse because Trump still hasn’t figured out how to handle the politics of the protest movement sparked by the police killing of George Floyd. Axios reported the campaign is debating whether Trump should talk about national unity. Trump took some solace in last week’s unemployment report, which was less horrendous than many economists expected. “He was in a good mood, he thinks the jobs numbers will turn things around,” said a Republican that spoke with Trump.

www.vanityfair.com/…

Brideshead Revisited, about Hooper is perfect for Jared Kushner:

“Though himself a man to whom one could not confidently entrust the simplest duty, he had an overmastering regard for efficiency and, drawing on his modest commercial experience…”