Trump tweets attempt to distract us from his vulgarian reality, revealed by Michael Cohen

Trump’s desperation shows in attempting to try nearly anything, however inept he was in trying to confuse the public about voting by mail. Such wackiness is meant to avoid the oncoming publication of the Michael Cohen book.

Similarly, Trump could appear to have won in a landslide with only 15% of the vote in on 3 November, only to lose when all votes are counted several days later. The problem occurs when Trump and malign media falsely declare him the victor before vote counting is completed.

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The Trumpian psycho-drama also includes the revelation that Trump may have had sex more than once with Stormy Daniels. She has only admitted to one encounter (in Nevada or California), but Cohen purportedly mentions a second location.

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“Can you believe that bulls–t? Can you believe people believe that bulls–t?”

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“Stuck with the tab for Trump’s sex romp in a hotel room in Utah a decade ago,” Cohen writes. “This was the job I loved?”

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Cohen writes that during the 2016 campaign, Trump was dismissive of minorities, describing them as “not my people.” “I will never get the Hispanic vote,” Cohen recounts Trump claiming. “Like the blacks, they’re too stupid to vote for Trump.”

Cohen describes Trump’s obsessive hatred of Obama, including claiming that the only reason the former president got into Columbia University and Harvard Law School was because of “f—ing affirmative action.” He also recounts Trump’s “low opinion of all black folks.” claiming that Trump once said while ranting about Obama, “Tell me one country run by a black person that isn’t a s—hole. They are all complete f—ing toilets.”

www.washingtonpost.com/…

“Donald Trump's presidency is a product of the free press. Not free as in freedom of expression, I mean free as unpaid for. Rallies broadcast live… 24-7 wall-to-wall coverage, all without spending a penny. The free press gave America Trump.” – Cohen

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A top Democratic data and analytics firm told “Axios on HBO” it's highly likely that President Trump will appear to have won — potentially in a landslide — on election night, even if he ultimately loses when all the votes are counted.

Why this matters: Way more Democrats will vote by mail than Republicans, due to fears of the coronavirus, and it will take days if not weeks to tally these. This means Trump, thanks to Republicans doing almost all of their voting in person, could hold big electoral college and popular vote leads on election night.

  • Imagine America, with its polarization and misinformation, if the vote tally swings wildly toward Joe Biden and Trump loses days later as the mail ballots are counted.
  • That is what this group, Hawkfish, which is funded by Michael Bloomberg and also does work for the Democratic National Committee and pro-Biden Super PACs, is warning is a very real, if not foreordained, outcome.

What they're saying: Hawkfish CEO Josh Mendelsohn calls the scenario a “red mirage.”

  • “We are sounding an alarm and saying that this is a very real possibility, that the data is going to show on election night an incredible victory for Donald Trump,” he said.
  • “When every legitimate vote is tallied and we get to that final day, which will be some day after Election Day, it will in fact show that what happened on election night was exactly that, a mirage,” Mendelsohn said. “It looked like Donald Trump was in the lead and he fundamentally was not when every ballot gets counted.”

By the numbers: Under one of the group's modeling scenarios, Trump could hold a projected lead of 408-130 electoral votes on election night, if only 15% of the vote by mail (VBM) ballots had been counted.

  • Once 75% of mail ballots were counted, perhaps four days later, the lead could flip to Biden's favor.
  • This particular modeling scenario portrays Biden as ultimately winning a massive victory, 334-204.
  • The methodology, described in detail below, was based in part on polling from FiveThirtyEight in August.
  • The ultimate results may well sit somewhere between these low-end and high-end scenarios and will also be impacted by who actually votes, and how voters' views about their options change over the coming weeks.

www.axios.com/…

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