Trump defending racist statues is not a hill on which to die, not even a suburban one

It is more of a comment on Trump’s “cancel culture” that the Aurora, Colorado police would bust up a crowd of violinists peacefully demonstrating a bias death.

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— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) July 4, 2020

“Trump needs — or thinks he needs — fear of ‘the other’ to motivate his base and create enthusiasm,” said Christine Matthews, a Republican pollster. “Right now, people are fearful of Covid-19, but that is inconvenient for Trump, so he is trying to kick up fear about something he thinks will benefit his re-election: angry mobs of leftists tearing down American history.”

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— Annie Karni (@anniekarni) July 4, 2020

WASHINGTON — President Trump used the spotlight of the Fourth of July weekend to sow division during a national crisis, denying his failings in containing the worsening coronavirus pandemic while delivering a harsh diatribe against what he branded the “new far-left fascism.”



In a speech at the White House on Saturday evening and an address in front of Mount Rushmore on Friday night, Mr. Trump promoted a version of the “American carnage” vision for the country that he laid out during his inaugural address — updated to include an ominous depiction of the recent protests over racial justice.

In doing so, he signaled even more clearly that he would exploit race and cultural flash points to stoke fear among his base of white supporters in an effort to win re-election. As he has done in the past, he resorted on Friday to exaggerated, apocalyptic language in broadly tarring the nationwide protests against entrenched racism and police brutality, saying that “angry mobs” sought to “unleash a wave of violent crime in our cities” and that those seeking to deface monuments want to “end America.”

Mr. Trump followed up with his remarks on Saturday from the South Lawn of the White House, which sounded more like a campaign rally, and repeated the themes from the previous evening.

“We will never allow an angry mob to tear down our statues, erase our history, indoctrinate our children or trample on our freedoms,” Mr. Trump said, claiming that protesters — who have won broad public support, including from corporate America — were “not interested in justice or healing.”
Mr. Trump cast himself as the heir to “American heroes” who defeated Nazis, fascists, communists and terrorists, all but drawing a direct line from such enemies to his domestic critics.

“We are now in the process of defeating the radical left, the Marxists, the anarchists, the agitators, the looters, and people who in many instances have absolutely no clue what they are doing,” he said.

www.nytimes.com/…

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— David Frum (@davidfrum) July 5, 2020

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— David Frum (@davidfrum) July 5, 2020

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Defending American history by denouncing the pulling down of statues is a bad bet. It’s certainly possible to compare tearing down of Columbus statues to some anti-Papist statement because the period of their erection paralleled the erection of Jim Crow Confederacy statues, but the real impetus is still about racism. The recent St Johns church photo-op is about dominionist messaging that would use “religious freedom” to suppress speech rights. So much media manipulation and self-contradiction / self-ownage.

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The event was widely publicized, but allegations that it had been staged were soon published. One picture from the event, published in the Evening Standard, was digitally altered to suggest a larger crowd.[5] A report by the Los Angeles Times stated it was an unnamed Marine colonel, not Iraqi civilians who had decided to topple the statue; and that a quick-thinking Army psychological operations team then used loudspeakers to encourage Iraqi civilians to assist and made it all appear spontaneous and Iraqi-inspired.[6] According to Tim Brown at Globalsecurity.org: “It was not completely stage-managed from Washington, DC but it was not exactly a spontaneous Iraqi operation.”[7]

The Marines present at the time, 3rd Battalion 4th Marines as well as 1st Tank Battalion, maintain that the scene was not staged other than the assistance they provided.[8]

Robert Fisk described the event as “the most staged photo opportunity since Iwo Jima.”[9]

en.wikipedia.org/…

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