Things really important to me

First an apology. My post yesterday on my decision to vote for Warren (which I did at about 9:45 AM) and to contribute to her campaign ($100 online) was my first posting here in more than a month. Some may remember that in mid-November I suffered a stroke, later had surgery to relieve the stenosis in my carotid artery that caused the stent, followed by a brief TIA.  I am still not fully back to energy, and have had less to spend online and writing, because I am still teaching full-time (and grateful that my school has been so generous and supportive of me through my medical travails).

I am not yet committing to the level of regular blogging that was so much a part of my life a few years ago, but after the positive response of yesterday, and the number of people who told me they value what I have to offer, I decided to offer this piece.

Let me be clear. There are things very important to me that will NOT be a part of this —  our now almost 19 year old rescued cat is one example.  Other things, like the health issues my wife and I have addressed over the past 7+ years are a part because they undergird the thinking that has led to this piece, which given where I am posting it is of course political in nature.

Political in nature —  I say that in a very broad sense. That is, this is an explanation of how I shape my own thinking when it comes to political matters:  what issues I consider, what aspects of those issues, the moral decisions with which they confront me.

I do not fit into easy categories. As an early Baby Boomer (born May 1946) I lived through and participated in and knew well some of the activists of the political activities of the 1960s and later, but my own politics can be considered very eclectic. After all, the political campaigns in which I have been active have included people fairly conservative on some issues of importance to Democrats, like Webb and Hollings, and others who were considered too far “left” by many, including McGovern.

These will be the musings of one man now approaching 74, who still thinks very much about the future because he spends his working hours teaching teenagers.

Make of it what you will, if you are interested enough to keep reading.