The Daily Bucket–The Foliage Frogs of Fall.

Some years I stop seeing my tiny backyard frogs by August.  The Spring-hatch of tadpoles have all morphed, and the older frogs have dispersed to nearby areas, beyond my vision. 

This year, however,  The frogs ‘ Spring-hatch was plentiful, and I often found 5 or 10 frogs on every morning walk.

Now the Summer days are done, but unlike other years, I can still find active frogs in October. 

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The frog sights in on a gnat, upper RH corner

I made a point of leaving plenty of rotting pears and apples in the underbrush to attract lots of fruit flies.  The frogs (and hummingbirds) cashed in on that tiny bounty.

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This picture emphasized that frogs are mostly leg;  their hips are behind their shoulders.  

Would these shades of green be so vivid if frogs did not  live within? 

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Thanks for reading;

What have you noted in your area or travels? Any stealthy critters in your yard? Please post your observations and general location in your comments. I’ll check back by lunchtime.

/s/ Redwoodman