The Daily Bucket–The Dinosaur Tree

While rival armies swarmed over hapless China during and after WW II, dedicated scientists struggled to continue their own research.

Despite the risks, intrepid researchers pursued the legend of the secret  Valley of the Tiger, filled with magical trees that co-existed with dinosaurs, but went extinct  about when the Andes Mountains rose, 20 million years ago.

One researcher finally stumbled into the Valley. He staggered at the sight of the first of the 100-foot-tall living fossils, and summoned others. This Chinese valley  was the only location in the entire world that still harbored these large and lovely trees; the Dawn Redwoods. Yet the ravaging armies and their artillery drew near.

The Chinese researchers spread the word, the Save The Redwoods League kicked in a few bucks,  and in 1948, an aging UC professor and others snuck into China, and brazened and bribed their way back out with an armful of seedlings. They generously distributed the seedlings, and now countless thousands of the verdant Dawn Redwoods brighten much of the globe.

cdnc.ucr.edu/…

I was told there was a grove of five dawn redwoods from the original seedlings in the UC Berkeley Botanical Gardens.  They weren’t on the map. I scanned the treetops on the hillsides, searching for the foliage.  I saw the treetops of five grouped redwoods, but they were far too large to be dawns; maybe 60-70 feet tall.

Yet when I got to the creek and walked alongside, I was headed right towards them.

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Proof I’m not making up  all of this stuff.  Well not all of it.

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Redwoodman added for scale.

Now it’s your turn.

You’ve been reading The Daily Bucket,

a nature refuge.

We amicably discuss frogs, animals, weather, climate, soil, plants, waters,  and life’s patterns.

 Phenology is how we take earth’s pulse.

We discuss what we see in each Bucket.

We value all observations.  Please comment  about your own natural area, and include photos if possible.  We love photos!

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Thanks for reading;

What have you noted in your area or travels? Know about any especially old and large trees? Please post your observations and general location in your comments. I’ll check back by lunchtime.

/s/ Redwoodman