The Daily Bucket–The Artichoke Frog

I ventured out into a crisp Autumn morning with my camera.  This was the first year we’d successfully grew artichokes in our backyard and I wanted pictures.  After harvesting a half dozen ‘chokes from the two plants,  I cut one plant down to a frazzled stump, and let the other one grow, just to see.

The hacked-down plant rapidly recovered its foliage and surprise, it even yielded 3 more artichokes!

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It’s been two months since the artichoke fruited, so these are welcome, and will be eaten very soon, as soon as I find the butter.

The artichoke plant formed a nice shape with shiny leaves.

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My favorite thistle.

I moved in for a tighter shot of the ‘chokes.  HOLY S—T!! WHAT WAS THAT!!

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Geez, I’m only a frog.

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You know me, I’m Pseudacris regilla, the Tree Frog.
 

B—–t, you’re a Chorus frog!

“Tree frog!!”

“NO!”

“Well, I’m in a m—-f–— tree, aren’t I?”

“That’s an artichoke, not a tree.”

“Well I’m half a meter off the ground, so b-— me.”

Pseudacris regilla arecommonly known as either tree frogs or chorus frogs in the West and Pacific Northwest.   Different species of tree and chorus frogs are widespread throughout the northern Hemisphere.

“True” tree frogs will have exaggerated  toe pads to help them grip and climb.  My backyard frogs’ toe pads are nothing special.  I’ve never seen them climb higher than a foot or so to get into a vegetable bed or pear bin. 

This creature was almost two feet up on the ‘choke.

I am deeming it La Alcachofa Rana, The Artichoke Frog.

My backyard frogs flourished this year. I saw them in the garden, in the Frog Mitigation Area, in the Lamb’s Ear, and now in the artichokes.  I’ve seen this particular frog before.  It’s bulk make it distinctive; it’s a little pudgy.  She’s been pigging out on the fruit flies and gnats.  Fallen apples and pears are less than 20 feet away.   She and several of the frogs have tiny black pigment dots; I’m hoping to use those for IDing frogs.  

She and several other female frogs have set up a collective in the Lamb’s Ear.  They all boast distinctive patterns of green and brown.

Here’s a look at the Lamb’s Ear patch where perhaps a dozen frogs reside.

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The Lamb’s Ear are the low plants behind the Heron’s head, at the photo’s top. 

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Extra pretty frog pictures.

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And another, all in the Lamb’s Ear.

Now it’s your turn.

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Thanks for reading;

What have you noted in your area or travels? Any stealthy critters in your yard? Please post your observations and general location in your comments. I’ll check back by lunchtime.

/s/ Redwoodman