The Daily Bucket–Surprise!!

The inch-an-hour storms have driven the anglers away from my Neighborhood’s Bethany Lake.  It’s full of hungry trout but the anglers flee the storms, heading home with a full creel and soaking wet clothes.

IMG_0875.JPG
Bethany Lake’s stocked rainbow trout are fattening up, hopefully on bullfrogs.

And when the anglers flee, the resident creatures recapture the best fishing spots. In these pictures, Billy is fishing from the crest of a concrete check dam.  Fish swim in circles immediately above the dam.  

Usually there’s a family there on the picnic bench, and the smallest child can fish for pumpkinseed sunfish at that spot above the dam.

In this instance, Billy Heron does not even like me looking from twenty yards.  The Red Winged Blackbirds have been harassing the heron, following them for over two miles. Maybe the Heron is edgy and hungry. 

IMG_1062.JPG
Billy can’t tolerate me, even at a premier fishing spot.  I’m wondering if I irritate the Heron.  I see other people watching the Heron and it doesn’t spook as easily around them. 

IMG_1040.JPG
A very common carp, but an uncommon size; perhaps 10 lb.  The anglers and I had been following the big guy.  It had come down out of the stormwater flows in the West Portland foothills, and halted where the culvert passed under a six lane road. 

We saw it roiling in the shallow water, and then it came under the culvert and into the main body of Bethany Lake. They tried to catch it at the dam, but failed. I think the fish was ill and unable to resist the currents that carried it over the falls.

A fish this big may be invulnerable to herons or raccoons.  Carp are invasive.
 

IMG_1065.JPG
The heron blurs as it flies into a vortex.

IMG_1066.JPG
Reality shivers as the huge heron forces its way between two realities.

IMG_1069.JPG
Billy Heron starts the getaway by flying into a Matisse painting.

IMG_1070.JPG
There’s bound to be more down fish there somewhere; Matisse did paint goldfish after all.

Billy landed deep into a thicket, it appeared. But this heron will only land where it has unimpeded wingspan to leave quickly.  Actually it hid out on  a small pond with open water in the thicket, not much larger than my own backyard ponds, where a different culvert guides a creek beneath the road, forming a small pond.

Nutria, geese, ducks, and the heron bicker over these small ponds, especially since the bigger lake is getting crowded with anglers. 



I also spotted a golf course plover (killdeer) and a cedar waxwing in an unexpected long-distance photo; both first time sightings for me at this lake. 

 Thanks for reading the Daily Bucket

Phenology is how we take earth’s pulse.

We discuss what we see in each Bucket.

We value all observations, as we ponder the cycle of life.  Please comment  about your own natural area, and include photos if possible.  We love photos!

To have the Daily Bucket in your Activity Stream, visit Backyard Science’s profile page and click on Follow, and join to write a Bucket of your own observations.

SPOTLIGHT ON GREEN NEWS & VIEWS” IS POSTED EVERY SATURDAY AT 3:00 PM PACIFIC TIME ON THE DAILY KOS FRONT PAGE. IT'S A GREAT WAY TO CATCH UP ON DIARIES YOU MIGHT HAVE MISSED. BE SURE TO RECOMMEND AND COMMENT IN THE DIARY.

Now it’s your turn!  What have you noted in your area or travels? Any pretty bugs  in your yard? Please post your observations and general location in your comments. I’ll check back later.

/s/ Redwoodman