The Daily Bucket–Like a Bird on a Wire

We’ve taken to walks along Springerville Creek, west of Portland Oregon.  At some points it’s a quarter mile wide expanse of tall grasses between neighborhoods, with a narrow creek wending its way between larger ponds.

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The fence posts are from an old farm. 

And at the larger ponds, that lovely Kestral was hanging out on the power wires.  Although we called them sparrowhawks, the Kestrals also feast on large bugs, snakes, and small rodents.  They also eat frogs so I will have to teach them the difference between native frogs and invasive bullfrogs. They will take squirrels; still my pounding heart!

At the golf course, they would hover, and then fall on their prey from the sky.

According to Cornell’s All About Birds, it is between robin and crow in size, but this one was barely robin sized. Telephone wires are their noted habitat.  They live throughout North America and many migrate to the southern US, and occasionally South America, during winter.

They nest in cavities and tree hollows and don’t use nesting materials, instead hollowing out a depression.

Their clutch is 4-5 eggs.

Now it’s your turn.

You’ve been reading The Daily Bucket,

a nature refuge.

We amicably discuss frogs, animals, weather, climate, soil, plants, waters,  and life’s patterns.

 Phenology is how we take earth’s pulse.

We discuss what we see in each Bucket.

We value all observations.  Please comment  about your own natural area, and include photos if possible.  We love photos!

To have the Daily Bucket in your Activity Stream, visit Backyard Science’s profile page and click on Follow, and join to write a Bucket of your own observations.

Thanks for reading;

What have you noted in your area or travels? Snow on the bird feeders yet?

Please post your observations and general location in your comments. I’ll check back by lunchtime.

/s/ Redwoodman