The Daily Bucket: Good for the Hawk, Bad for the Robin.

Trigger warning for sadness.

The sun shown through the russet and tawny and cream of what seemed to be a feathered explosion in the robin’s nest.  I watched from a few feet away, with only enough time to lift a hand.

Two Robin sentinels sped to the scene but the hawk’s powerful wingstrokes carried it, with two baby robins,  into the sanctuary of a nearby giant Sequoia Redwood, where the progeny of the robin became biomass for the hawk’s own chicks. 

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A stunned momma Robin watched.  It happened so fast.

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With the nest emptied, the robins have vanished.  

I love to see them by the Lake, on my daily walks.

But I don’t want them in my backyard, anymore, the relentless hawks.

The little birds eat bugs; some even eat slugs!



The hawk consumes the helpless, a raptor obsessed

The yard size has not changed, but has diminished.

When the hawk has finished.

I’d seen the flickering shadow on the ground

As it circled around, 

backlit by a summer sun,

every afternoon, as predictable as the moon.

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Right around 3 pm every day, sometimes with a vocal juvie.
 

It always watched.  Some times I saw it, sometimes not,

Peering down from on top a Pine knot.

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Red-Tail? Sharp shinned? Cooper’s?  I don’t care.

They didn’t fight fair. 

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Now it’s your turn!  What have you noted in your area or travels? Any pretty birds in your yard? Please post your observations and general location in your comments. I’ll check back later.

/s/ Redwoodman