Reminder: Senator Mitch McConnell Is the Republican Nancy Pelosi.

Senator Mitch McConnell is an unpopular guy not only in his home state but nationally, and given the response from Republican voters in other states, McConnell is the Republican version of Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi.  Remember that little special election for a U.S. Senate seat in Alabama?  McConnell intervened in that special election, and this happened:

The bad blood runs deep: McConnell's camp spent millions of dollars trying to stop Moore from winning the nomination in the primary fight against Sen. Luther Strange, and then the Republican majority leader himself said Moore should drop out because his accusers were credible.

But it's McConnell, not Moore, who ought to quit, according to Moore and his supporters.

“I think he needs to step down. I don't think he's doing what his job is. Period,” said Tim Myer, 56, co-owner of Bob's Tires in Attalla, in the northeast section of the state, and a Moore donor. “The American people voted Trump in as president and McConnell is going against everything the president is trying to do. He needs to be the person to support the president.”

The charged that McConnell has been too involved in Alabama resonates not only with Moore voters but also with Republicans who once supported a third contestant in the GOP primary, Rep. Mo Brooks, only to watch McConnell allies rough him up. The claim that McConnell has to go frames Moore as a champion of Trump, who won the Alabama presidential primary with a strong plurality of 43 percent in 2016.

Well, that is a one off.  Right?  It is just Alabama Republican voters who feel that way about McConnell.  Um, no:

Washington (CNN) — On the campaign trail, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is becoming the GOP's version of Nancy Pelosi: He remains a powerful force, but no one wants to stand too close to him.

The latest evidence of McConnell's toxicity among Republican voters came in a West Virginia Senate debate this week. All three Republican candidates were asked to raise their hands if they supported McConnell for majority leader. None did.
“I'm not the product of the liberal establishment,” state attorney general Patrick Morrisey said. “I think that's why you're seeing all the conservatives come out for me. I'm going to make the right decision after we get through the general election.”
Rep. Evan Jenkins praised McConnell for shepherding Neil Gorsuch's Supreme Court nomination through the Senate but said: “Mitch McConnell hasn't even asked for my support. I think it's way too premature.”

However, despite the lack of love for Senator Mitch McConnell, no one in the Media or among D.C. Republicans is asking McConnell to step aside for “new leadership.”  No matter what I think of McConnell, he was able to keep his Republican majority in the U.S. Senate after the midterms.  And he has been very effective at 1) obstruction of Obama’s and any Democratic agenda and 2) stealing judicial seats and ramming Republican judges onto the SCOTUS.

But according to Republicans, the Media, and some centrists Democrats, if you are an effective leader, help win elections, and are unpopular, you should lose your job.  

That’s the message I take from all this BS about Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi not being Speaker of the House.  

If we apply the same standard to Mitch McConnell that we do to Nancy Pelosi, Democrats, the Media, and some Republicans should be calling on McConnell to not be senate majority leader.  At least Pelosi is popular in her district, unlike McConnell who is unpopular in Kentucky.   But you know what?  McConnell could give a flying fuck what others think about him.  And Republicans could give a shit about what Democrats think about McConnell.



Keep that in mind folks when you hear all the supposed reasons for Nancy Peloisi not to be Speaker of the House.