Evil Force in The Second Sex mentioned by Simone de Beauvoir [migrated]

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The Politicus
Nov 25, 2021 10:42 AM 0 Answers
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So I am reading The Second Sex by Simone de Beauvior. In page 30, she writes the following where I am confused.

Indeed, beside every individual’s claim to assert himself as
subject—an ethical claim—lies the temptation to flee freedom and to
make himself into a thing: it is a pernicious path because the
individual, passive, alienated, and lost, is prey to a foreign will,
cut off from his transcendence, robbed of all worth. But it is an easy
path: the anguish and stress of authentically assumed existence are
thus avoided.

The whole piece goes like this

At the moment that women are beginning to share in the making of the
world, this world still belongs to men: men have no doubt about this,
and women barely doubt it. Refusing to be the Other, refusing
complicity with man, would mean renouncing all the advantages an
alliance with the superior caste confers on them. Lord-man will
materially protect liege-woman and will be in charge of justifying her
existence: along with the economic risk, she eludes the metaphysical
risk of a freedom that must invent its goals without help. Indeed,
beside every individual’s claim to assert himself as subject—an
ethical claim—lies the temptation to flee freedom and to make himself
into a thing: it is a pernicious path because the individual, passive,
alienated, and lost, is prey to a foreign will, cut off from his
transcendence, robbed of all worth. But it is an easy path: the
anguish and stress of authentically assumed existence are thus
avoided.

Is Simone implying that the path to freedom robs one of their transcendence through some evil force? I understand that being enslaved gives one some sort of definition in a power hegemony albeit it robs them of their actualised existence. But what is she suggesting with this foreign will that lurks in the shadows of this pernicious path? Especially with the "it is a pernicious path because the individual, passive, alienated, and lost, is prey to a foreign will, cut off from his transcendence, robbed of all worth.", it sounds like the enslaved identity catered to the individual's transcendence, before the rebellion took it away and now the distraught individual is destined to fall into the jaws of some evil will

I must mention I am neither a native English speaker nor a philosophy student. I found this book and have just started to read.

Thanks in advance.

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  • November 25, 2021