Does the US policy towards 5 smaller countries in South Asia depend on the final say of India?

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The Politicus
May 31, 2021 08:40 PM 0 Answers
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according to the following link:

The Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs, headed by Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Dean Thompson, deals with U.S. foreign policy and U.S. relations with the countries of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Through diplomacy, advocacy, assistance, and learning from the past we advance the interests of the American people, their safety, and economic prosperity. We execute our mission by cultivating a diverse, inclusive, and fair working environment that supports and empowers “our people,” from all backgrounds, identities, and thought.

On the other hand, according to the following link:

  • SCA Front Office – The office of the Assistant Secretary and other principals in the bureau
  • Office of India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Bhutan, and Maldives Affairs – Informs policy and coordinates with U.S. Missions in India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Bhutan, and the Maldives
  • Office of Pakistan Affairs – Oversees Pakistan–United States relations, and liaises with the U.S. Embassy in Pakistan
  • Office of Central Asian Affairs – Informs policy and coordinates with U.S. Missions in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan,
    Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan
  • Office of Security and Transnational Affairs
  • Office of Press and Public Diplomacy – Coordinates public outreach and digital engagement, and prepares press guidance for the
    Department Spokesperson in the Bureau of Public Affairs
  • Office of Afghanistan Affairs – Oversees Afghanistan–United States relations, and liaises with the U.S. Embassy in Afghanistan

I have an impression that the same office looks after India and 5 other countries, and that office considers India as the leader of those 5 countries.

I have this impression because: (1) the same office looks after 6 countries, (2) India is way bigger both in population, economy, and military, (3) India has a long history of intervening in domestic affairs of those countries, and we never saw any negative statement from the USA in those cases.

Is my impression correct?

If that is so, has the USA left India free in case of what India does to those 5 countries? In other words, does the US policy towards those 5 smaller countries in South Asia depend on the final say of India?

Note: Be kind enough to supply appropriate citations and references to support your argument.

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