Platform objections at the DNC, because delegates are serious about their candidate

A twitter pie-fight is currently simmering but it’s unclear whether people/bots are doing it for the lulz.

It appears that Bernie delegates will still vote to represent their constituents, because there are policy positions at stake.

In the case of Cori Bush, there’s likely some supporters of the defeated Lacy Clay stirring something up on Twitter, considering the personal attacks.

The primary beefs return to the convention even if there is greater unity than in 2016, or at least having a virtual convention avoids some of the shenanigans that will probably happen for the GOP’s convention.

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And in other health related craziness, Esper eyes $2.2 billion cut to military health care during a pandemic

Research into hypersonic weapons, artificial intelligence, missile defense and more.will apparently have higher priority than military healthcare. Apparently military votes don’t count in 2020.



The proposed cut to the military health system over the next five years is part of a sweeping effort Esper initiated last year to eliminate inefficiencies within the Pentagon’s coffers. But two senior defense officials say the effort has been rushed and driven by an arbitrary cost-savings goal, and argue that the cuts to the system will imperil the health care of millions of military personnel and their families as the nation grapples with Covid-19.

Esper and his deputies have argued that America's private health system can pick up the slack.

— Kyle Griffin (@kylegriffin1) August 17, 2020

Esper rolled out the results of the first iteration of the defense-wide review in February, revealing $5.7 billion in cost savings that he said would be put toward preparing the Pentagon to better compete with Russia and China, including research into hypersonic weapons, artificial intelligence, missile defense and more.

But the proposed health cuts, in the second iteration of the defense-wide review, would degrade military hospitals to the point that they will no longer be able to sustain the current training pipeline for the military’s medical force, potentially necessitating something akin to a draft of civilian medical workers into the military, the two defense officials said.

The second official noted the challenge in finding outside doctors given longstanding complaints from some U.S. hospitals and researchers that there aren’t enough physicians to serve civilians.

“How’s a 'draft' even going to work?” the official said “The U.S. is dealing with a doctor shortage.”

www.politico.com/…

Fortunately, the GOP and their convention will have much more chaos.

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As Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s star rises in the Democratic Party, all eyes are on how the progressive powerhouse will influence the 2020 platform — and with it the prospects of Joe Biden at the top of the ticket.

The New York Democrat endorsed Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) in the Democratic presidential primary, becoming one of his most vocal and prominent surrogates. She also frequently criticized Biden, the former vice president, as overly centrist, saying in January that the two would be in different political parties “in any other country.”

Since Biden became the Democrats’ presumptive presidential nominee earlier this year, Ocasio-Cortez has emerged as a key figure in attempts to bridge the ideological gap between the party establishment and the more populist camp represented by Sanders. Shortly after Sanders exited the race, she joined the party’s “unity task force,” which developed policy recommendations designed to satisfy both factions and build a common front against President Trump heading into November.

In an even more prominent role, Ocasio-Cortez is also scheduled to speak Tuesday at the Democrats’ virtual convention, providing an unusual platform for a first-term lawmaker — and self-described democratic socialist — who’s often at odds with the party brass. A day later, she’s set to address the same audience in a separate video segment.

It’s not that Ocasio-Cortez is driving the ship. The proposed platform she helped develop does not include “Medicare for All,” a signature issue for both her and Sanders, nor does it contain key components of the Green New Deal, the liberals’ wish list for environmental policy. However, it does embrace a host of other progressive priorities, including a public health insurance option, guaranteed early childhood education and a $15 minimum wage.

As a result, the party platform set to be adopted at the virtual convention is “definitively [the] most progressive platform that will be adopted by the Democratic Party,” Joel Rubin, a strategist with the liberal group Democracy Partners, told The Hill.

thehill.com/…

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— The Washington Post (@washingtonpost) August 17, 2020

President Trump’s catastrophic fumbling in the face of a pandemic and economic collapse invites comparison to Hoover’s haplessness, even if the 31st president was as morally upright as the 45th is not.
Every second of the gathering will be an advertisement of Trump’s failure: the convention that could not meet because of the health crisis the incumbent could not manage.
And a New Deal-style commitment to active, fact-based, problem-solving government really does match the mood of a country that wants a virus conquered, jobs and incomes on the rise again and fairness enshrined in the economic system.

[…]
Thus, if Biden’s choice of Harris reaffirms his party’s more recent embrace of racial equality, it is also a latter-day version of Roosevelt’s bet: that a new generation of immigrants — this time from Asia and the Caribbean, from Latin America and Africa — would, in alliance with other Americans fed up with incompetence and divisiveness, drive a transformation of our politics.
Much of the week’s speechmaking will focus on the calamity that is Trump’s presidency. But the historic task of this “unprecedented and unusual” convention is clear: To help Biden prove that a 21st-century New Deal alignment can be assembled from more diverse building blocks by embracing both racial and economic justice.

www.washingtonpost.com/…

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