The Politicus

Minerva @ Midnight: Summer augurs a continuation of bad faith and disinformation

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Minnesota law enforcement, at its based level exhibits some intersectional issues often represented in fictional culture products like Fargo. Their police forces haven’t learned very much since the death of George Floyd. So many examples of bad faith below:

George Floyd, Philando Castile. Why do Minnesota police keep killing Black men? <a href="https://t.co/BWRsDwRZRg">https://t.co/BWRsDwRZRg</a></p>— Slate (@Slate) <a href="https://twitter.com/Slate/status/1384003800399155202?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 19, 2021</a></blockquote>”>
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— Brian Stelter (@brianstelter) April 18, 2021

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— Mischa Coldwater (@RainbowOfRed) April 17, 2021

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— Carlos Gonzalez (@CarlosGphoto) April 13, 2021

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— AJ+ (@ajplus) April 13, 2021


“…Kristian Rouz, is a Russian native who has also worked for #Sputnik, a Kremlin-controlled news outlet, which was first reported by The Daily Beast. Sputnik has been accused by intelligence services of contributing to Russia’s efforts to interfere in American elections.”

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— Rachel C. Abrams (@RachelAbramsNY) April 18, 2021

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— K. Louise Neufeld (@ninaandtito) April 19, 2021

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— Brianna Wu (@BriannaWu) April 17, 2021


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— ST Opinion (@STopinion) April 18, 2021

As in every society, there remain a minority of individuals who are hesitant or have doubts about the vaccines, for a variety of reasons, and a host of efforts are ongoing to allay concerns that groups like seniors may have.

Some of their worries are fed by misinformation – which is generally purveyed through informal networks like chat groups and friends.

Researchers have noted that some of this false information is shared within closed networks out of genuine concern, or a lack of knowledge.

On-the-ground engagement, and campaigns to address doubts they may have, are necessary and helpful in assuaging these worries.

Public education on sifting out dubious information may also help people be more discerning of what they read.

[…]

While misinformation refers to information that is false or out of context, disinformation is a subset of misinformation that is deliberately created or spread with the intent to mislead.

Observers note that these anti-vaxxers spend a disproportionate amount of time online and on social media, where they imbibe material that reinforces their beliefs, generally along these lines: Covid-19 is not dangerous; Covid-19 vaccines are dangerous; scientists (and governments) cannot be trusted.

What is particularly disturbing is that most of this disinformation can be traced back to – and appears to be deliberately manufactured by – a small group of anti-vaccine activists, aided by social media platforms and their algorithms that amplify viral content.

Recent reports by the Centre for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH), a think-tank based in Britain and the United States focusing on disinformation efforts, shed some light on this industry that has enabled anti-vaccine activists on Facebook, YouTube, Instagram and Twitter to reach over 59 million followers.

www.straitstimes.com/…

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“They (GQP) are the only organization in human history that is dedicated, with passion, to ensuring that human survival, survival of organized human society, will be impossible,” —  Noam Chomsky

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— digby (@digby56) April 19, 2021

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— New York Magazine (@NYMag) April 19, 2021

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— Forbes (@Forbes) April 19, 2021


More nonsense from the TV Dinner heir. A pernicious bit of NIMBY intolerance is embedded in the same disinformation that Tucker Carlson is spreading, who undoubtedly got the vaccine, but is telling his audience it might not work. His cluelessness about the necessity for boosters given the mutations coming from the spread makes his lies dangerous.

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— The Onion (@TheOnion) April 16, 2021

https://t.co/LaNPYgO3sb?amp=1

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Tucker Carlson drew controversy earlier this week when he questioned whether Covid-19 vaccines are ineffective, and on Thursday, he claimed to viewers that Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla had offered up proof Pfizer’s vaccine dosage “doesn’t work” earlier in the day — in reality, Bourla was just discussing longstanding plans for booster shots.

Carlson has repeatedly used his show to insinuate public health officials are withholding information about coronavirus vaccines and trying to coerce unwilling patients into getting vaccinated. On Monday, he floated — but did not outright endorse — a new evidence-free theory: Health experts want people to keep socially distancing after getting vaccinated because they secretly know vaccines are ineffective. “Maybe it doesn't work, and they're simply not telling you that,” he said.

https://t.co/ghOIiTp6Wb?amp=1

These Fox News sponsors:

@LandOFrost
@legacybox
@tecovas
@Disney  (owner of @hulu)
@WeatherTech
@SandalsResorts
@TivityHealth
@pray
@StampsCom
@ProcterGamble
@amazon
@KraftHeinzCo
@Verizon
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Not everyone who is a white supremacist watches Tucker Carlson, but everyone who watches Tucker Carlson is a white supremacist.

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— The Daily Show (@TheDailyShow) April 16, 2021

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History demands that we pay more attention to Tucker Carlson's parroting of racist “replacement” theory,

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— David Corn (@DavidCornDC) April 16, 2021


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— Fifty Shades of Whey (@davenewworld_2) April 17, 2021

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— ABC News (@ABC) April 18, 2021

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