Le Petomane Trump’s line between real and fake Americans excludes urban people of all sorts

“Work, work, work, work, work, work, work. (turns to the bosom of a female staffer) Hello boys! Have a good night's rest? I missed you! Gentlemen, affairs of state must take precedent over… affairs of state.” Trump is truly Le Petomane.

Trump’s America must remedy the horrible ills of . . . Trump’s America.

x
There is much that can be said about President Trump’s intemperate, interminable convention speech. It combined the generous, unifying spirit of an average Trump campaign rally with the concision and amusement value of a typical State of the Union address. After a week of speeches from Republicans attempting to humanize their nominee, Trump demonstrated that it is possible to be brutish and boring at the same time.
The speech was ripe with rhetorical tensions. Trump called for “a new spirit of unity that can only be realized through love for our great country.” So, Americans can be united — but only if they accept Trump’s version of American nationalism. The president is, in essence, urging national unity against people who don’t accept his version of unity. The point is subtle to the point of absurdity.

For this strategy to work, Trump must disqualify Biden for the presidency as a weak and willing tool of radical leftists. That won’t be easy. But Trump’s convention speech was helpful and revealing in an unintended way. Any president who uses a moment of national division to drive our divisions deeper has disqualified himself for the office.

x

The symbol of that exclusion is FLOTUS.

First Lady Melania Trump’s former senior adviser and close friend has written a tell-all book that describes the first lady as someone who can’t be trusted and who often competed for influence in the White House with Ivanka Trump.

Stephanie Winston Wolkoff’s new book “Melania and Me: The Rise and Fall of My Friendship with the First Lady,” reveals that Melania wanted to block Ivanka’s face from appearing in photos of Donald Trump taking the oath of office, in a maneuver dubbed “Operation Block Ivanka.” (The operation was mostly successful.)

“Melania didn’t want to move to the White House right away in part because she didn’t want to have to use the same shower and toilet as former First Lady Michelle Obama”

x

— Melania and Jared Kushner and Ivanka are big fans of the Kennedys and their Camelot myth. “It’s no coincidence that all three of their children—Arabella, Joseph, and Theodore—share names with Kennedy family members. Edward ‘Ted’ Kennedy and Joseph Kennedy you know; Arabella Kennedy was JFK and Jackie’s stillborn daughter,” Winston Wolkoff writes.

www.politico.com/…

$26 MILLION FLOTUS EX-FRIEND: TRUMP SAID “I WANT TANKS AND CHOPPERS. MAKE IT LOOK LIKE NORTH KOREA.”

x

— Amee Vanderpool (@girlsreallyrule) August 29, 2020

x

— Michael McFaul (@McFaul) August 29, 2020

x

— Bradley P. Moss (@BradMossEsq) August 29, 2020

x

— David Menschel (@davidminpdx) August 30, 2020

Trumpers are trying to expand the suburban message even as the actual Portland protest area is four city blocks. It’s a number six.

x

— Allison Mechanic (@AlliMechanic_TV) August 30, 2020

Image
John Michael Posobiec III (/pəˈsoʊbɪk/ pə-SOH-bik; born December 14, 1985)[1] is an American alt-right[2][3][4] political activist and conspiracy theorist[5] who is considered an Internet troll.[6][7][8][9] Posobiec is best known for his pro-Donald Trump comments on Twitter, as well as using white-supremacist and anti-semitic symbols and talking points, including the white genocide conspiracy theory.[10][11][12][13] He has promoted fake news, including the debunked Pizzagate conspiracy theory that high-ranking Democratic Party officials were involved in a child sex ring.[14] As of 2018, he was working as a correspondent for One America News Network, a conservative cable news television channel.[15]

Image

x

x

— Sergio Olmos (@MrOlmos) August 30, 2020

x

x

— Bakari Sellers (@Bakari_Sellers) August 30, 2020

x

— SafetyPin-Daily (@SafetyPinDaily) August 30, 2020

x

Those who commit crime on a grand scale, numbering their victims in the thousands, seem to pose a special problem both for consequentialist and for non-consequentialist theories of punishment, a problem the International Criminal Court makes practical. 

philpapers.org/…

x

— Jay Rosen (@jayrosen_nyu) August 30, 2020

x

<

p class=”is-empty-p”>