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“‘I Answered the Call of My President’: Rioters Say Trump Urged Them On” …debunking the Big Lie

6 min read

The Big Lie must be thoroughly erased. This delusion is unfortunately the trope deployed as a grand commodity for a national grift that could last until 2024.

In the more immediate instance, actions still have consequences, even if Trump implies that he will give pardons in the case of the insurrections. More likely is that he will give some of the principals pardons, like Mo Brooks, but will he pardon both Lauren Boebert and her mother.

“A ‘Big Lie’ is a propaganda technique used for political purpose. Coined by Adolf Hitler, when he dictated his 1925 book Mein Kampf, about the use of a lie so “colossal” that no one would believe that someone “could have the impudence to distort the truth so infamously”

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2/10.  A Big Lie changes reality. To believe it, people must disbelieve their senses, distrust their fellow citizens, and live in a world of faith.
3/10.  A Big Lie demands conspiracy thinking, since all who doubt it are seen as traitors.
4/10.  A Big Lie undoes a society, since it divides citizens into believers and unbelievers.
5/10.  A Big Lie destroys democracy, since people who are convinced that nothing is true but the utterances of their leader ignore voting and its results.
6/10.  A Big Lie must bring violence, as it has.
7/10.  A Big Lie can never be told just by one person.  Trump is the originator of this Big Lie, but it could never have flourished without his allies on Capitol Hill.
8/10.  Political futures now depend on this Big Lie. Senators Hawley and Cruz are running for president on the basis of this Big Lie.
9/10.  There is a cure for the Big Lie. Our elected representatives should tell the truth, without dissimulation, about the results of the 2020 election.
10/10.  Politicians who do not tell the simple truth perpetuate the Big Lie, further an alternative reality, support conspiracy theories, weaken democracy, and foment violence far worse than that of January 6, 2021.

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At first glance, the comparison makes sense. In both cases, enemies of the United States deliberately attacked one of the most potent symbols of American democracy. In each instance, federal authorities failed to protect the Capitol from predictable assault. But it is important to remember historical analogies are useful not only for identifying similarities, but also for highlighting differences between the past and present.
The differences between 1814 and 2021 offer a much more troubling picture of the dangers faced by our democratic republic. In 1814, the enemy came from outside; in 2021, the enemy came from within. In 1814, British forces captured the Capitol under wartime conditions; in 2021, American citizens stormed Congress in peacetime. In 1814, King George III commanded his soldiers (though his appointed officers) to attack the Capitol; In 2021, Donald Trump, the president of the United States, goaded armed insurrectionists to attack Congress.

[…]

While security in the Capitol undoubtedly will be tightened and reinforced, truly protecting the building and its symbolism in our democracy requires addressing the root causes of the assault. That means holding leaders accountable for encouraging the insurrectionary attempt by deliberately lying to their followers about the outcome of the 2020 presidential election. Only buttressing security at the Capitol would represent a failure to recall that while the similarities to historical events are important, so too are the differences. It would leave the building — and our democracy — exposed to further assault.

www.washingtonpost.com/…

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— Lauren Camera (@laurenonthehill) January 17, 2021

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— Jay Emme (@JayEmme00) January 15, 2021

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— James Kosur (@JamesKosur) January 18, 2021

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— 60 Minutes (@60Minutes) January 18, 2021

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— Asha Rangappa (@AshaRangappa_) January 17, 2021

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— John P. Flannery (@JonFlan) January 17, 2021

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— Nathan Newman 🧭 (@nathansnewman) January 16, 2021

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— AntiFash Gordon (@AntiFashGordon) January 18, 2021

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— Shane Burley (@shane_burley1) January 18, 2021

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— Michael Beschloss (@BeschlossDC) January 17, 2021

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— Rex Chapman🏇🏼 (@RexChapman) January 17, 2021

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— Variety (@Variety) January 18, 2021

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