ClimateCatastrophe Greenland MVGA Recommended WildFire

Greenland is on fire, again.

It’s bad and I can hear it now. Why didn’t anyone warn us?

We have, of course, but Donald's distractions are nothing but click bait here, and we fall for it every single time. But go ahead and keep on keeping on helping the President play us along with the media, like a Stradivarius.  Billions of free media for this guy, just like in 2016. We will get what we deserve with the climate catastrophe along with the re-election of Trump. The media plays his game every single fucking day.

WonderingLass nails it in the comments – ”Maybe Trump is our tipping point, he is the embodiment of all that is wrong with the world”.

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There is a worrisome phenomenon in the Arctic called shrubification. Due to rising global temperatures from our carbon emissions, frozen tundra has been thawing enough that invasive shrubs have been able to expand into new terrain that was once only small flowers, grasses, moss, and lichens.

In southwest Greenland, the normally semi-arid region has experienced increasing temperatures and rainfall. As a result, increased vegetation in the rapidly changing landscape now has a sufficient fuel supply that can trigger wildfires by either natural or human-caused activity.

The fire, discovered July 10, 2019, by NASA satellites, is the second wildfire to break out in the same vicinity since July of 2017. Like the 2017 fires, the current fire was preceded by warming temperatures and dry conditions.

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NASA reports:

Remote sensing scientists were surprised to find a large wildfire burning in western Greenland in the vicinity of Sisimiut in August 2017. Two years later, another fire popped up in the same region.

Satellites first detected evidence of the fire on the morning of July 10, 2019. The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 captured an image of it on the afternoon of July 10. The image below is natural-color (OLI bands 4-3-2), overlaid with the infrared signature of actively burning fires. At the time, southwesterly breezes blew smoke away from the fire.

The fire burned in Queqqata Kommunia, about 18 kilometers (11 miles) northwest of Sarfannguit, a village just east of Sisimiut. Fires in this part of Greenland are usually small. Unlike the 2017 fire, this one occurred near a hut on the Arctic Circle Trail and was likely started accidentally by a hiker, noted University of Miami scientist Jessica McCarty. It appeared to be burning in an area with mossy wetlands called fen and heath shrublands.

Warm, dry weather helped set the stage for the fire. Meteorological data shows the region has been unusually hot and dry in recent months. And it was warm the day that the fire burned.

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It is unclear at this point whether peat had ignited as it had in the 2017 fire.