GA-Sen B: “After GA GOP House Speaker asks for help, Kelly Loeffler condemns ‘blue state bailouts’”

The Atlanta Journal Constitution reported that Georgia House Speaker David Ralston (R. GA) reached out to both U.S. Senators David Perdue (R. GA) & Kelly Loeffler (R. GA) last week about Congress approving a $500 billion relief package to help states stay afloat during the coronavirus pandemic. Ralston emphasized helping the thousands federal employees furloughed and for school funding. The AJC points out that this is how Loeffler responded:

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One of those senators, Kelly Loeffler, may have answered Ralston on Saturday, when she Tweeted out a clip of her interview on Fox news.

“We’ve been looking at a package that’s very focused at jobs, kids and health care,” Loeffler said – making no mention of the speaker’s worries.

Then she said this about Trump’s intentions: “He wants to make sure we don’t have blue state bailouts. We want to get back to the blue-collar boom that he built.”

I guess Loeffler considers Georgia to be a Blue State. Then again, she’s running like Georgia is still a deep red state:

Nowhere is Loeffler’s embrace of Trump’s culture warrior style more evident than in her role as the Dream’s co-owner. In that capacity, she’s become an outspoken antagonist of recent player-led protests against racism and police violence, generally involving a spurning of the National Anthem in some form (Dream players walked off the court during the Star Spangled Banner at a recent game).

“There is no room for racism in this country. We cannot have it. But there's an organization different from the saying, an organization called Black Lives Matter founded on Marxist principles,” Loeffler said in June. “I think it's a really uninformed, political, reactive statement that just divides our country. And in a league that has always sought tolerance, it's pretty shocking.”

Loeffler, who has since stood by that position and branded criticism a symptom of “cancel culture,” took a decidedly less confrontational tone on National Anthem protests shortly before her foray into politics. Just last year, when asked about U.S. women’s soccer star Megan Rapinoe’s protest at the Women’s World Cup, Loeffler sounded magnanimous.

Meanwhile, Democrats are pushing to make sure Rev. Raphael Warnock (D. GA) gets through the crowded jungle race in this special election:

Party leaders hope to consolidate support behind Warnock for two reasons: First, to ensure that the runoff wasn’t an all-Republican affair between Loeffler and U.S. Rep. Doug Collins, who is also polling strongly. And secondly, for the outside chance that a unified Democratic ticket could win outright.

The muddled dynamics are one reason that Sabato’s Crystal Ball, a product of the University of Virginia’s Center for Politics, recently projected a Republican is likely to win the contest. Kyle Kondik, a political scientist, said the poll numbers, for now, give Republicans a shot at crowding out Democrats.

“Democrats have work to do to just get into the runoff, and if they get there, they have to deal with the same turnout problems that have beguiled them in past runoffs,” Kondik said, referring to the GOP’s recent dominance in Georgia runoff votes. “So the Republicans have a few important backstops in this race.”

Let’s help Warnock pull this off and flip Georgia Blue. Click below to donate and get involved with Warnock, Ossoff, Biden and their fellow Georgia Democrats campaigns:

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