“…democracies suffer from post-electoral violence due to the delay in the publishing of results”

Discovery and disinformation are ahead as RWNJs are looking for reasons to overturn the election, but are perhaps more about grifting. The reality remains that Trump tried to manipulate processing of ballots by installing a crony in USPS, among other things yet to be determined. Attempts to manipulate the system got complicated by large numbers of postal ballots in the face of a pandemic. Transparency and opacity have become contestable in ways unanticipated by many of the players. What a concept, more standardization needed in voting procedures for federal elections.

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— Jon Ralston (@RalstonReports) November 9, 2020

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— Alayna Treene (@alaynatreene) November 8, 2020

President Trump plans to brandish obituaries of people who supposedly voted but are dead — plus hold campaign-style rallies — in an effort to prolong his fight against apparent insurmountable election results, four Trump advisers told me during a conference call this afternoon.

What we're hearing: Obits for those who cast ballots are part of the “specific pieces of evidence” aimed at bolstering the Trump team's so-far unsupported claims of widespread voter fraud and corruption that they say led to Joe Biden’s victory.

  • Fueling the effort is the expected completion of vote counting this week, allowing Republicans to file for more recounts.

What's next: Team Trump is ready to announce specific recount teams in key states, and it plans to hold a series of Trump rallies focused on the litigation.

  • In Georgia: Doug Collins, the outgoing congressman who lost to Sen. Kelly Loeffler in a special election to fill former Sen. Johnny Isakson's seat, will be leading the campaign's recount efforts. The team has also redeployed 92 staffers from Florida to Georgia, doubling its group on the ground.
  • In Arizona: Kory Langhofer, former counsel for Trump's 2016 transition, will serve as lead attorney.
  • In Pennsylvania: Porter Wright's Ron Hicks is heading up the legal effort.
  • Nationwide: They're assembling additional surrogates and lawyers.

“We want to make sure we have an adequate supply of manpower on the ground for man-to-man combat,” one adviser said.

https://t.co/HGfpZjSVXA

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— Jennifer Cohn ✍🏻 📢 (@jennycohn1) November 7, 2020

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— Jennifer Cohn ✍🏻 📢 (@jennycohn1) November 8, 2020

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— Jennifer Cohn ✍🏻 📢 (@jennycohn1) November 8, 2020

The number of mailed ballots not delivered by Election Day is expected to grow as more postal data is released in the coming days. Some election experts worry such delays could run up against even more generous ballot acceptance windows that some states have granted.
In several swing states, late ballots will still be counted as long as they were postmarked by Election Day and received by Friday. They include Nevada, where 4,518 ballots arrived on Wednesday and 635 arrived Thursday, as well as North Carolina (2,958 on Wednesday and 835 on Thursday) and Pennsylvania (3,439 Wednesday and 1,459 Thursday). But states such as Arizona (864 Wednesday and 559 Thursday) and Georgia (853 Wednesday and 610 Thursday) don’t accept any ballots after Election Day.
Sam Spital, litigation director for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, said the vast majority of those ballots were delivered in a timely manner and most were in states with more lenient ballot acceptance deadlines.
Because the counts are ongoing in those states, it is unclear whether undelivered ballots would have made a difference in deciding the presidential election. But the delivery failures highlight the risks in relying on the mail service to deliver ballots close to Election Day.
www.washingtonpost.com/…

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— Jennifer Cohn ✍🏻 📢 (@jennycohn1) November 9, 2020

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— Joe Biden (@JoeBiden) July 20, 2020

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— Michael MacKay (@mhmck) November 9, 2020

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