'barricaded' Trump as classic counterintelligence risk: deeply in debt, angry at the U.S. government

Trump sells off his private helicopter after losing the election, so perhaps he’s cash-short, even as he’s running another grift, claiming he’d run again in 2024.

However, there’s other shenanigans possible in the remaining 70 days, including a small-scale international military action that in itself could cause a continuing problem for a Biden administration, or simply serve as a diversion from compromising US national security. Trump unfortunately could become an even greater Russian asset than his value as a useful idiot. 

Trump as a “barricaded subject”.


As a practical matter, there's little that the Biden administration can do to stop Trump from blurting out national secrets. Former presidents do not sign nondisclosure agreements when they leave office. They have a right to access information from their administration, including classified records…

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WASHINGTON – As president, Donald Trump selectively revealed highly classified information to attack his adversaries, gain political advantage and to impress or intimidate foreign governments, in some cases jeopardizing U.S. intelligence capabilities. As an ex-president, there's every reason to worry he will do the same, thus posing a unique national security dilemma for the Biden administration, current and former officials and analysts said.

All presidents exit the office with valuable national secrets in their heads, including the procedures for launching nuclear weapons, intelligence-gathering capabilities – including assets deep inside foreign governments – and the development of new and advanced weapon systems.

But no new president has ever had to fear that his predecessor might expose the nation's secrets as President-elect Joe Biden must with Trump, current and former officials said. Not only does Trump have a history of disclosures, he checks the boxes of a classic counterintelligence risk: He is deeply in debt and angry at the U.S. government, particularly what he describes as the “deep state” conspiracy that he believes tried to stop him from winning the White House in 2016 and what he falsely claims is an illegal effort to rob him of reelection.

“Anyone who is disgruntled, dissatisfied or aggrieved is a risk of disclosing classified information, whether as a current or former officeholder. Trump certainly fits that profile,” said David Priess, a former CIA officer and author of “The President's Book of Secrets,” a history of the top-secret intelligence briefings that presidents and their staff receive while in office.

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In August 2019, he tweeted a detailed aerial image of an Iranian launchpad. Such photos are among the most highly guarded pieces of intelligence because they can reveal precise details about technical spying capabilities.
Using publicly available records, Internet sleuths were able to determine which satellite took the image and identify its orbit based on the image Trump disclosed.

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…as of Jan. 20, 2021, Trump becomes a private citizen, and the immunity he enjoys from criminal prosecution vanishes.

www.washingtonpost.com/…

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Former Acting FBI Dir. Andy McCabe said in 2019,“His demand for documents identifying confidential informants does harm to the men and women of the FBI on a fundamental level.”

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Experts expressed concern Trump will attempt to use classified information for personal gain

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— Bob Cesca (@bobcesca_go) November 11, 2020

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— Stephen Wolf (@PoliticsWolf) November 11, 2020

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