Court to Florida government employee fired for lynching comments: You are NOT the victim

The assistant finance director for Florida’s Seminole County Clerk of Courts was once a man named Stan McCullars. Emphasis on “was.”

A little background:

In January 2017, Aramis Ayala became Orange-Osceola State Attorney. She’s also the first African American to hold the office in the Sunshine State. Unfortunately, this historic achievement has been marred by the way Ayala has been treated so far. Just two months after taking office, Ayala announced that she would not pursue the death penalty at all, and specifically in a felony case involving the death of an Orlando police officer. Though she faced great criticism, Ayala only did what other prosecutors have done—and more should do—by saying she will no longer seek the death penalty because one, the death penalty does not deter crime and two, it is not administered fairly. 

State Attorney Aramis Ayala

Then-Gov. Rick Scott, always one to add fuel to the flames, then removed her from 29 first-degree murder cases for not pursuing the death penalty. Scott did this despite being told by 100 legal experts that he was wrong and unlawful. However, in a ruling that shocked no one, Scott’s stacked Supreme Court said otherwise. Ayala ultimately complied and created a seven-member panel of prosecutors to determine which cases should receive the death penalty.

It wasn’t just Scott, of course: The police union was none too pleased. You might have seen this July 2017 viral video, which shows her being pulled over by Orlando police, supposedly to see if her car was stolen, even though she had properly registered vehicle tags.

This is also where McCullars comes in. Just a few days after Scott removed Ayala from the first-degree murder cases, McCullars decided to weigh in on a Facebook post of an Orlando Sentinel story about Ayala. She “should be tarred and feathered if not hung from a tree,” McCullars commented, adding that “SHE should get the death penalty.”