Ooooops! A misstatement from me. And a correction.

Well, it's almost lunch time, so I'm ordering some delicious crow. But I'm ordering the diet plate, so it's only half a sandwich, with a side of hot and sour soup.

In an article I posted about a week ago, I predicted the identity of whom I thought at least one, if not two “unnamed” witnesses in the upcoming Paul Manafort trial, for whom the prosecution had requested partial”use immunity” were. In the article, I spoke about at least one, if not two employees of a small bank in Chicago, the Federal Savings Bank. As support, I noted that in the days leading up to his appointment as the Trump campaign manager, Paul Manafort had obtained loans from the bank totaling $16 million. A reader commented that they thought that I was incorrect, that Manafort had not received the loans until well after he left the campaign.

And, as Rachel Maddow, my source for the previous assertion showed last night, I was wrong. Manafort did in fact not receive the loans until the winter of 2016, well after he had left the Trump campaign in August. It was a simple and understandable error on  my part. For, as Rachel went on to clarify, while Manafort did not receive the loans until December and January, he had actually submitted the loan request and paperwork in April, when he was active in the Trump campaign.I simply recalled my facts incorrectly. And I humbly apologize for the error.

In the same article, I posited that the chairman of the bank, Steven Calk, along with at least one loan officer who worked the loans were among the five secret witnesses I thought the government was talking about. As with all things Murf, it was a 50-50 split. While Steven Calk was not named as one of the witnesses, two former or current loan officers at the bank were. Believe me, I'll take being right 50% of the time in this case, since according to my wife Teri, I'm normally correct 0% of the time,

And actually, Calk's omission as a witness raises an interesting prospect for me. Since Calk was the rube that Manafort conned into thinking that he could get nominated to be Secretary of the Army by approving the loans, he would have made a natural witness to show Manafort's duplicity. The fact that he is not appearing makes me think that one of two things is going on. Either the DOJ is still considering filing bank fraud charges against Calk, and doesn't want to make his prosecution more difficult, or, and I find this more likely, the prosecutors are sidelining Calk as a favor to the Illinois Attorney General, to make any potential prosecution of theirs clearer, without having to dodge around the federal “use immunity.” Either way, I just don't think that we've heard the last of Steven Calk yet.

So, there you have it. Murfster made a boo-boo, and he fessed up to it. And many thanks to the sharp-as-a-tack reader who caught the error, and brought it to my attention.And now, if you'll all excuse me, it's time for dessert. Maybe a nice piece of humble pie?

The wait is over! Volume two of the trilogy, President Evil II: A Clodwork Orange is now available. Amazon is whining about me crashing their site, but the hell with them, I ain't in this for their health. You can also find volume one, President Evil as well. And fear not, work on volume three is just beginning.

Cross posted on Politizoom.com

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