Do you agree with Wendy Davis' stance on open-carry? Read more     What grade letter would you give Obamacare? Read more     An internal review about "Bridge-gate" ordered by Christie is clearing the Republican of any wrongdoing. Do you buy it? Read more     Should Violent Juveniles be Treated as Adults in Court? Read more      ​Should ​​taxpayers fund creationism​ ​in the classroom​?​ Read more     SHOULD NATO CONSIDER MILITARY ACTION AGAINST RUSSIA OVER CRIMEA? Read more     Will the government shut down of 2013 cost the GOP their House majority in the mid-term elections? Read more     Should the Senate withold its consent to a DOJ nominee based on the clients a nominee defended during their legal career? Read more     Do you support the White House’s expansion of Russia-related sanctions? Read more     Do you think Paul Ryan's comments about “inner cities” culture is a thinly veiled racial attack? Read more     

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The Invisible War: Military Sexual Assault Bill Fails

March 7, 2014 by THE POLITICUS

The Invisable War

There were 3,553 reported sexual assaults in the Military in 2013. As we all know sexual assaults are one of the most under reported crimes in the United States. So we could easily be looking at 6,000 total sexual assaults in the Military. What makes the failure to pass the "Military Justice Improvement Act" even more disturbing is the number of sexual assaults jumped 46% vs. 2012. So obviously keeping these types of crimes within the Militarily Chain of Commend isn't working. It is time for an outside obiter to look at these case so women can serve their country without the fear of being raped!    Read more

Blog Poll: 
Do you think it's fair to have an outside obiter come in and look at sexual assaults cases involving Military personnel?

Do you think the country is better or worse off in 2013 than it was in 2012?

December 26, 2013 by Andrew17

Choices

Fed publicizes plans for additional economic stimulation

December 6, 2013 by hemlock

The Federal Reserve said that it arranged the choice of more economic easing following the release of August's poor jobs report. Those efforts have been formulated, and were publicized on Thurs. Article resource: Fed Economic Stimuls
 

Drive down borrowing expenses

The Federal Reserve has decided it is necessary to drive down borrowing expenses even more after a two-day meeting with the policy committee. The Federal Reserve explained that it will spend $40 each month on mortgage backed securities to do this. This will be a 3rd round of “quantitative reason.”

Short term interest rates will stay at historic lows for six months longer than they used to until the end of 2015. The Federal bank has publicized this change in policy.

In 2013 and 2014, the Federal Reserve lowered its growth outlook for 2012 from 2.4 percent to 2 percent. By 2014, the unemployment rate is anticipated to decrease from 8.1 percent to 6.7 percent too.

Stock market rallies following announcement    Read more

Why the GOP dismisses the U. S. Constitution...

December 2, 2013 by Richrd_45

The GOP needs to ultimatly answer why they dismiss the U. S. Constitution.

The Republican party today is so ideologically driven, they completely dismiss the Constitution of the United States when they try to implement Legislation, or they disagree with the rights of the American people. Today's GOP seems to disagree with every main stream social view that most Americans agreed upon in the 2012 election which the U. S. Constitution upholds.

Much of the obstruction we see from the Republican< party today is a correlation of hatred for a President of color, and the fact that American voters won't support their many out of touch ideas that prove again and again to be wrong for the country by a large margin of American's. Voting or otherwise.

Democrats have always been mostly bipartisan and keeping inline with the U. S. Constitution when they're the minority in Congress so the people's business can go on. The Democratic party is ardent about this.

We don't see this kind of reasoning with the Republican party today. The Media has a responsibility to call out these Republicans who inconceivably ignore the U. S. Constitution for their ideological purposes, but at the same time say they're standing on U. S. Constitution principals.

Rush Limbaugh Renews Attack on Sandra Fluke

November 14, 2013 by ProgLegs

Sandra Fluke

On Wednesday's show, Rush Limbaugh used an online ad campaign to dust off his misogynistic attack on Sandra Fluke.  The ads attempt to attract young people to Obamacare by, in Limbaugh's view, promising fellatio.    Read more

Money Madness: Why and How College Athletes Should be Paid

October 6, 2013 by zgorwitz

Free markets and college football. Deeply embedded into the sociocultural fabric of American life, these two time-honored traditions are incompatible. Why is scandalous headline after scandalous headline born from the act of receiving compensation for working hard, an act that is laudable in every other profession? The answer lies in one dogmatic, pious, hypocritical, bloated bureaucracy of a governing body: the National Collegiate Athletic Association. However, with targeted new policies, the NCAA and member schools can enjoy the best of both worlds.

An Environment of Inequity

The collegiate athletic system desperately demands reform. Young men and women are putting in 50-hour workweeks, on top of classes, and all they have to show for it is NCAA President Mark Emmert’s $1.7 million dollar salary. To put it bluntly, the NCAA’s revenues and operating budget thrive off the exploitation and suppression of “student-athletes” with nowhere else to turn for a playing field.     Read more

Re-characterizing an unfair portrayal

September 25, 2013 by daniel.f.strunk

Oftentimes I feel as though the views of the Republican Party are not properly characterized in campus discourse. Today I’d like to briefly summarize four oft-ignored perspectives on the Republican economic agenda, which isn’t as scary as it is usually portrayed in campus debate.

First and foremost, the Republican Party is not a party that only cares about rich people. Republicans want everyone to have a good-paying job that provides for his or her family. Many Republicans come from humble beginnings and humble backgrounds. Many were immigrants who came to this country with nothing but a dream. They know what it is to face hard times, and are not callous to the difficult circumstances in which many impoverished people find themselves.

In short, Republicans do not differ with Democrats at all in terms of empathy. Rather, they differ in their beliefs regarding the means by which to help the poorest among us. I think it’s safe to say Republicans have more faith in the power of free markets than the Democratic Party. Republicans would argue that free markets, unencumbered by unnecessary government regulation, allow for the greatest growth in prosperity for all.    Read more

Fourth grade inmates and the Republican Party

September 25, 2013 by daniel.f.strunk

If you read at an average pace, it will take you four minutes to finish this column. By the time you’re done, approximately nine U.S. students will have dropped out of high school. That’s 1.2 million dropouts a year—dropouts who are qualified for only 10 percent of new jobs, are eight times more likely to be incarcerated and are 50 percent less likely to vote. When Texas projects how many prisons it will need 10 years from today, one of the data points it considers is the percentage of literate Texas fourth graders. The correlation is strong—six out of 10 American prison inmates are illiterate.

America’s educational problems permeate all aspects of our society—from economic growth to crime to national security. And that’s not a new, tantalizingly fresh concept I’ve just written. In preparing to write this column, I found so many websites with educational crisis statistics that my Google Chrome froze from an overload of tabs.    Read more

Citizens United and the Perils of Super PACs

September 3, 2013 by mstinnett311

Michael Stinnett - 9/03/2013: Legal rulings such as Citizens United and lax campaign financing laws have undermined the democratic process allowing wealthy donors to buy elections; so-called Super PACs are a pernicious influence on society and should be abolished. A Super PAC, or independent expenditure-only committee, “may raise unlimited sums of money from corporations, unions, associations and individuals, then spend unlimited sums to overtly advocate for or against political candidates. Super PACs must, however, report their donors to the Federal Election Commission on a monthly or quarterly basis – the Super PAC's choice – as a traditional PAC would. Unlike traditional PACs, Super PACs are prohibited from donating money directly to political candidates” (Super PACs). The recent ruling protects political spending by corporations in candidate elections, citing the First Amendment's protection of freedom of speech. In justifying the ruling, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy wrote that “'If the First Amendment has any force, it prohibits Congress from fining or jailing citizens, or associations of citizens, for simply engaging in political speech'” (The New York Times).    Read more

God Colors Outside The Lines

September 1, 2013 by Ted Frier

The subject of Father Scott's homily on Sunday was "tunnel vision," something our local parish priest knows a lot about since it was not until he was in his twenties and well out of high school that Father Scott finally got his driver's license. "Tunnel vision," said the state trooper who flunked him. "Stop focusing on the straight lines in front of you and see everything around you."

But it wasn't to whine about being the only kid in his senior class who still rode a bike to school that Father Scott brought up the subject of "tunnel vision." Instead, it was as a prod to urge the rest of us to stop fixating on the bright lines defining our own narrow prejudices, or tribes, or self-imposed prisons so that we might see the larger world around us.

That is because, as Father Scott explained, "God colors outside the lines."

Mine is a parish, as I have mentioned before, that lies on the outskirts (and mostly under the radar screen) of the larger Boston Archdiocese. It's a town that is predominantly Jewish but which has a protestant church on three of the town square's four corners and also a mosque all our own.    Read more

Should Judges Be Elected?

August 26, 2013 by gawilliams14

When Justice Sandra Day O'Connor retired from the Supreme Court in January of 2006, one of the issues she felt very strongly about was the increasingly common call for federal judges, and state judges, to be elected as opposed to appointed. She was decidedly against the idea, and has put a great deal of her time, outside of hearing cases on various federal courts of appeal and encouraging greater civics education, to fighting efforts in various states to turn to an elective system of placing judges on the bench. A number of states already have an elective system in place, or variants of it, but at the Federal level the Constitution in Article 3 creates the appointive process of nomination by the President and confirmation by the Senate. The question I have been pondering more and more lately is whether it is really desirable to have elected judges. I will attempt to answer that question with this article.    Read more

Justice Ginsburg: Unfairly Criticised?

August 24, 2013 by gawilliams14

There has been some ongoing debate about Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and some comments she made about constitution making in countries that are endeavoring to rewrite, or develop whole new constitutions. I would like to examine whether she is being unfairly attacked in these debates.    Read more

Supreme Court Nomination Hearings: Joke or Serious Exercise?

August 13, 2013 by gawilliams14

I recall vividly in the summer of 1987 when Court of Appeals Judge Robert Bork was before the Senate Judiciary Committee going through the ordeal of a hearing on his nomination to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. I had been studying the history of the Supreme Court for a couple of years at that point, and was very interested in seeing this process play out. By the end of it, I was sorely disappointed, and a little frustrated at the antics of the Senators, both on and off the Committee. Since then, I have been more and more disillusioned about the process of nominating, and confirming, an individual to the Supreme Court. While this disillusionment applies equally well to lower Federal courts, I am focusing my attention on the Supreme Court.    Read more

What Is Lacking?

August 11, 2013 by gawilliams14

A few years ago I was asked to give a short talk on the subject of Roe v. Wade. As I have always been interested in the Supreme Court and the individuals who have served on it, I readily agreed. Knowing how controversial that particular decision was, I decided to try a little experiment. Opening the talk, I asked how many supported the decision. Roughly half the hands went up. Then I asked how many opposed it. Again, roughly half raised their hands. Then I asked the most important question. How many have actually read the decision? Sadly, out of perhaps 20 people two raised their hands. I asked them when that shocking revelation revealed itself "How can you support or oppose something without even having taken the time to read it to know what it actually says?"    Read more

Obama and the Coup in Egypt

July 12, 2013 by toritto1942

So does anyone really believe that the Obama administration had nothing to do with the removal of Mohammed Morsi as the duly elected President of Egypt? If you do, I’ve got some nice land I would like to sell you here in Florida.

Did you notice the casual indifference as Egypt spiraled into chaos? You were supposed to notice. Obama went golfing; John Kerry went sailing. I mean we’re just bystanders, and those poor Egyptians — we hope they can sort themselves out. Yeah right.

These guys play a pretty fair hand a lot of the time, but they have overplayed this one. Anyone who thinks the U.S. is not complicit up to its eyebrows in the Egyptian army’s unlawful coup needs a refresher in our history.

It is now common currency to say that Morsi, who served just a year after he was legitimately elected in June 2012, failed some kind of democracy test. He did no such thing. There was a test, but the failure belongs to Washington. It professes to like democracies all over the planet, but it cannot yet abide one that may not reflect America’s will.    Read more

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